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April 19 2014

red667
00:41
6333 db79
Reposted fromkaiee kaiee viaboarding boarding

February 27 2014

red667
14:23
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Fever Variations - Karen Marie sings Peggy Lee's "Fever" in 12 Different Styles - YouTube
red667
11:27
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"Sweet Child O' Mine" - New Orleans Style Guns N' Roses Cover ft. Miche Braden - YouTube
Reposted bym68kgem

February 25 2014

red667
10:58
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Marteria - Endboss (Offizielles Musikvideo) - YouTube
Reposted bym68kflipovitschsguvolldost

February 23 2014

red667
19:28

February 21 2014

red667
18:23
3589 07c1 500
Reposted fromasparagus asparagus viasoadysta soadysta

January 30 2014

red667
14:15
Reposted fromgruetze gruetze viaclifford clifford
09:37
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sequentialawesome:

So…this happened. Enjoy, Kung Fu Grift.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzuJj85C3lw

Reposted fromekelias ekelias vialisa lisa

January 14 2014

red667
09:21
7783 70a1
Reposted fromverschwoerer verschwoerer viaatheism atheism

January 11 2014

red667
12:22
Because this can't go viral enough, I post it also here.

The picture above shows an open source laptop by the Chinese hacker bunnie. It's based on an ARM processor, has got an integrated FPGA and some more hacker-candy features.
Here is an article about the project, here's bunnie's blog post and here is a wiki-page with more technical details.

PS: Skip to the end of the talk to see the laptop in use.
Reposted fromsydnor sydnor viabons bons
red667
12:21
netwars / out of CTRL // extended trailer
Reposted fromastera astera

January 09 2014

red667
16:45
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!!!
Reposted fromhepke hepke viahanse hanse

January 08 2014

red667
08:01
4653 cb4b 500
Reposted fromalicemeow alicemeow viaclifford clifford

January 03 2014

red667
09:12
5984 dbdc
Reposted fromverschwoerer verschwoerer viaylem235 ylem235

December 20 2013

10:04

From CT Scans to 3D Prints

3-face-cup-2

[the_digital_dentist] had a CT Scan done back in 2007 for treatment using orthodontics. Some how, he managed to get a copy of the CT Scan data from the lab, and has been playing around with it lately.

Since he has a 3D printer, the obvious end goal was to print his face using some of the data extracted from the CT Scan. This required a lot of manipulation to get it to the finished model you see above. He used an open source software called DeVIDE to process the data and export the STL. Not much information on this is given on his site, but in our research we managed to find another video documenting the process in DeVIDE on extracting the STL model from DICOM CT scan data.

Unfortunately, the STL is far from being ready to print after being extracted; there is a lot of extraneous data that needs to be cleaned up. He used mesh editing software to help blow away the unnecessary details. We don’t know for sure what software [the_digital_dentist] used, but MeshLab is a good one.

After that, it was just a matter of printing the STL file. But the really cool thing about using data from CT scans is the amount of detail it captures… Stick around after the break to see an animated GIF demonstrating this.

5each

Anyone want to print a copy of their own skull? It’d look great with a plating of Adamantanium…


Filed under: 3d Printer hacks
Reposted fromhackaday hackaday

December 16 2013

red667
11:08
2420 a64c 500
Ak-Baital Pass, Pamir Highway, Tajikistan

Even at the end of the world...
Reposted fromflorianhufsky florianhufsky viakewagi kewagi

December 11 2013

10:03

Ultrasonic Data Transmission With GNU Radio

ultrasonic

When we hear GNU Radio was used in a build, the first thing we think of is, obviously, radio. Whether it’s a using extremely expensive gear or just a USB TV tuner dongle, GNU Radio is the perfect tool for just about everything in the tail end of the electromagnetic spectrum.

There’s no reason GNU Radio can’t be used with other mediums, though, as [Chris] shows us with his ultrasound data transmission between two laptops. He’s transmitting audio from the speakers of one laptop at 23 kHz. It’s outside the range of human hearing, but surprisingly able to be picked up by a cheap desktop mic connected to another laptop. His GNU Radio setup first converts a string of text to a 5-bit packet, modulates it with FSK, and bumps up the signal to 23 kHz. On the other end, the data is decoded by doing the same thing in reverse.

The setup is easily able to reject all audio that isn’t in the specified frequency range; in the video after the break, [Chris] successfully transmits a ‘hello world’ while narrating what he’s doing.


Filed under: radio hacks
Reposted fromhackaday hackaday

December 03 2013

red667
10:23
Reposted fromapfelstrudl apfelstrudl viagifluv gifluv
red667
10:22
6732 6801
Reposted fromgifluv gifluv

December 02 2013

red667
08:32
It's evolution baby
Reposted fromsillycripple sillycripple viaylem235 ylem235
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